Fredrick Arthur D’Altroy

(May 1, 1919 - January 1, 2013)

 Fred was born in Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada, the second child in his family.  When he was four years old he and his family moved to Port Alberni, British Columbia, a small logging and fishing town on a fjord along the Pacific coast of Vancouver Island.

 Fred’s father died when Fred was only 12 years old. By then, his family consisted of his mother and 4 children. They had very little money but with thrift, the help of a large garden, and left over catch received from the local fishing boats they were able to survive. His mother insisted on all the children staying in high school until they graduated.

 In the height of the depression, Fred held various jobs, and eventually joined the Canadian militia.  When the war in Europe broke out, Fred joined the Canadian Army and went overseas in 1941 as a member of the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI). He spent six years in Europe fighting in Sicily, Italy, Germany, and The Netherlands. 

 When he came back home Fred immediately signed up to attend University. During his first year there, he met his beloved wife, Louise Reimer. After a 3 week courtship, they decided to get married and have been a committed couple ever since.  

 Fred received his bachelor and masters degree at the University of British Columbia.  During that time, they had two children, Lawren Hugh and Terence Norman. 

 Fred and his family moved to Lafayette, Indiana so Fred could attend Purdue University. [Louise claims that he decided on this university because Purdue’s football team beat Notre Dame the year before and Fred wanted to go to a winning football school. The ironic thing was that he couldn’t afford to go to the games, so he got a job as an usher!] At Purdue, Fred majored in the, then, new field of solid state physics. After graduating with his Ph.D. he was hired by Bell Laboratories and focused on transistor research and development. He received 17 patents in this field.

 Fred retired after 26 years and then spent another 8 years continuing as a consultant for Western Electric Company, a related company to Bell Labs.  At that time, he and Louise moved from Pennsylvania to southern California and settled in Carlsbad, CA.

 Fred was a man of great interests. He loved music, reading, photography, and then also took up painting after retirement. His paintings were beautiful. He formed lasting friendships and was loved by many. Each of his nieces thought she was his favorite. 

 Fred remained in good health until he was almost ninety. In the last two or three years of his life he had serious infections and pneumonia. That and the arthritis in his knees resulted in his being bedridden for the last six months. Despite his pain, he never lost his sense of humor (or his appetite!).  Fortunately, by the time of his death, he was pain free and in a coma. He merely stopped breathing.

 After 66 years of marriage, he is survived by his wife Louise; his remaining son, Terence and wife, Mariela; his daughter-in-law, Mary Ni (wife of his pre-deceased son, Lawren); his grandchildren Susan, Alison, Jenny, Nicole, and Mateo; his sister Isabelle Richardson; and his devoted caregiver Alexander (Alex) Julian Pas, Jr.

 He leaves beautiful memories.

Fredrick Arthur D’Altroy

(May 1, 1919 - January 1, 2013)

Fred was born in Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada, the second child in his family.  When he was four years old he and his family moved to Port Alberni, British Columbia, a small logging and fishing town on a fjord along the Pacific coast of Vancouver Island.

Fred’s father died when Fred was only 12 years old. By then, his family consisted of his mother and 4 children. They had very little money but with thrift, the help of a large garden, and left over catch received from the local fishing boats they were able to survive. His mother insisted on all the children staying in high school until they graduated.

In the height of the depression, Fred held various jobs, and eventually joined the Canadian militia.  When the war in Europe broke out, Fred joined the Canadian Army and went overseas in 1941 as a member of the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI). He spent six years in Europe fighting in Sicily, Italy, Germany, and The Netherlands. 

When he came back home Fred immediately signed up to attend University. During his first year there, he met his beloved wife, Louise Reimer. After a 3 week courtship, they decided to get married and have been a committed couple ever since.  

Fred received his bachelor and masters degree at the University of British Columbia.  During that time, they had two children, Lawren Hugh and Terence Norman. 

Fred and his family moved to Lafayette, Indiana so Fred could attend Purdue University. [Louise claims that he decided on this university because Purdue’s football team beat Notre Dame the year before and Fred wanted to go to a winning football school. The ironic thing was that he couldn’t afford to go to the games, so he got a job as an usher!] At Purdue, Fred majored in the, then, new field of solid state physics. After graduating with his Ph.D. he was hired by Bell Laboratories and focused on transistor research and development. He received 17 patents in this field.

Fred retired after 26 years and then spent another 8 years continuing as a consultant for Western Electric Company, a related company to Bell Labs.  At that time, he and Louise moved from Pennsylvania to southern California and settled in Carlsbad, CA.

Fred was a man of great interests. He loved music, reading, photography, and then also took up painting after retirement. His paintings were beautiful. He formed lasting friendships and was loved by many. Each of his nieces thought she was his favorite. 

Fred remained in good health until he was almost ninety. In the last two or three years of his life he had serious infections and pneumonia. That and the arthritis in his knees resulted in his being bedridden for the last six months. Despite his pain, he never lost his sense of humor (or his appetite!).  Fortunately, by the time of his death, he was pain free and in a coma. He merely stopped breathing.

After 66 years of marriage, he is survived by his wife Louise; his remaining son, Terence and wife, Mariela; his daughter-in-law, Mary Ni (wife of his pre-deceased son, Lawren); his grandchildren Susan, Alison, Jenny, Nicole, and Mateo; his sister Isabelle Richardson; and his devoted caregiver Alexander (Alex) Julian Pas, Jr.

He leaves beautiful memories.

@1 year ago with 5 notes
#i don't deal with death very well #rest in peace grandpa fred #two guys i miss very much #dad #grandpa fred 
  1. stargirlphoto said: Such memories keep him alive, even in the hearts of strangers ♥ I’m sorry for your loss
  2. jenini posted this